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Cell free DNA and methylation patterns described as a possible result of smoking frequency. (Henry Beevers, 03 January 2013)

Due to the use of an entirely smoker free 'healthy' control group (CTR), this paper fails to distinguish between cell free DNA and methylation patterns caused by smoking, COPD and lung cancer. The increases seen in cell free DNA and increased promoter methylation of CDKN2A and MGMT could be caused by smoking as both the COPD and lung cancer groups in the study are entirely made up of smokers whilst being compared with a healthy group of non smokers, showing reduced cell free DNA and promoter region... read full comment

Comment on: Guzmán et al. Diagnostic Pathology, 7:87

Author's correction (Tomasz K Wojdacz, 03 January 2013)

In the paper we... read full comment

Comment on: Wojdacz et al. Diagnostic Pathology, 6:116

Change 1st cousins to 2nd cousins in Table 2. (Latifa Chkioua, 05 January 2012)

I comet a mistake, I will like to correct it.
I will like to correct this mistake. These patients were offspring of consanguineous marriage of second degree. The parents of this family have the same grandfather with different wife.
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Comment on: Chkioua et al. Diagnostic Pathology, 6:39

Typographical error (Hongxiu Han, 05 January 2012)

The data 97.2% shown in the article should be 96.9%. We apologize for the oversight. read full comment

Comment on: Han et al. Diagnostic Pathology, 6:59

On number of sections and statistical power (Vincenzo Della Mea, 10 February 2009)

After having attended the Authors' congress presentation, I read the paper with much interest, because it depicts very well a protocol for obtaining reliable results from image analysis on histological sections.However I would like to point out that the section entitled "Number of sections has little influence on statistical power of the study" reports a result well known since many years: statistical accuracy of a study depends more on the number of subjects enrolled than on the number of samples within the same subject, according to the Gundersen expression “Do more less well” (1). When dealing with rare condition, taking more samples from few subjects seems a shortcut for obtaining statistically significant results, but is not always the case.(1) Gundersen HJG, Osterby R.... read full comment

Comment on: Apfeldorfer et al. Diagnostic Pathology, 3:S16