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Open Access Case Report

Recurrent adult jejuno-jejunal intussusception due to inflammatory fibroid polyp – Vanek’s tumour: a case report

Kenneth M Joyce1*, Peadar S Waters1, Ronan M Waldron1, Iqbal Khan1, Zolt S Orosz2, Tamas Németh2 and Kevin Barry1

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Surgery, Mayo General Hospital, Mayo, Ireland

2 Department of Histopathology, Mayo General Hospital, Mayo, Ireland

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Diagnostic Pathology 2014, 9:127  doi:10.1186/1746-1596-9-127

Published: 27 June 2014

Abstract

Background

Adult intussusception is a rare but challenging condition. Preoperative diagnosis is frequently missed or delayed because of nonspecific or sub-acute symptoms.

Case presentation

We present the case of a sixty-two year old gentleman who initially presented with pseudo-obstruction. Computerised tomography displayed a jejuno-jejunal intussusception, which was treated by primary laparoscopic reduction. The patient re-presented with acute small bowel obstruction two weeks later. He underwent a laparotomy showing recurrent intussusception and required a small bowel resection with primary anastomosis. Histological examination of the specimen revealed that the intussusception lead point was due to an inflammatory fibroid polyp (Vanek’s tumour) causing double invagination.

Conclusions

Adult intussusception presents with a variety of acute, intermittent, and chronic symptoms, thus making its preoperative diagnosis difficult. Although computed tomography is useful in confirming an anatomical abnormality, final diagnosis requires histopathological analysis. Vanek’s tumours arising within the small bowel rarely present with obstruction or intussusception. The optimal surgical management of adult small bowel intussusception varies between reduction and resection. Reduction can be attempted in small bowel intussusceptions provided that the segment involved is viable and malignancy is not suspected.

Virtual Slides

The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/7292185123639943 webcite

Keywords:
Vanek’s tumour; Intussusception