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This article is part of the supplement: Proceedings of the 10th European Congress on Telepathology and 4th International Congress on Virtual Microscopy

Open Access Proceedings

How to measure diagnosis-associated information in virtual slides

Klaus Kayser1*, Jürgen Görtler2, Stephan Borkenfeld3 and Gian Kayser4

Author affiliations

1 UICC-TPCC, Charite, Berlin, Germany

2 IAT, Heidelberg, Germany

3 IBM, Mainz, Germany

4 Institute of Pathology, University Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany

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Citation and License

Diagnostic Pathology 2011, 6(Suppl 1):S9  doi:10.1186/1746-1596-6-S1-S9

Published: 30 March 2011

Abstract

The distribution of diagnosis-associated information in histological slides is often spatial dependent. A reliable selection of the slide areas containing the most significant information to deriving the associated diagnosis is a major task in virtual microscopy. Three different algorithms can be used to select the appropriate fields of view: 1) Object dependent segmentation combined with graph theory; 2) time series associated texture analysis; and 3) geometrical statistics based upon geometrical primitives. These methods can be applied by sliding technique (i.e., field of view selection with fixed frames), and by cluster analysis. The implementation of these methods requires a standardization of images in terms of vignette correction and gray value distribution as well as determination of appropriate magnification (method 1 only). A principle component analysis of the color space can significantly reduce the necessary computation time. Method 3 is based upon gray value dependent segmentation followed by graph theory application using the construction of (associated) minimum spanning tree and Voronoi’s neighbourhood condition. The three methods have been applied on large sets of histological images comprising different organs (colon, lung, pleura, stomach, thyroid) and different magnifications, The trials resulted in a reproducible and correct selection of fields of view in all three methods. The different algorithms can be combined to a basic technique of field of view selection, and a general theory of “image information” can be derived. The advantages and constraints of the applied methods will be discussed.