Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from Diagnostic Pathology and BioMed Central.

Open Access Short report

Static telepathology in cancer institute of Tehran university: report of the first academic experience in Iran

Afshin Abdirad1*, Babak Sarrafpour2 and Siavash Ghaderi-sohi3

Author Affiliations

1 Assistant Professor of Pathology, Cancer Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Cancer Institute, Keshavarz Blvd., Tehran, Iran

2 Resident of Oral Pathology, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Enghelab St, Tehran, Iran

3 Resident of Pathology, Cancer Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Cancer Institute, Keshavarz Blvd., Tehran, Iran

For all author emails, please log on.

Diagnostic Pathology 2006, 1:33  doi:10.1186/1746-1596-1-33

Published: 4 October 2006

Abstract

Telepathology is the practice of pathology, which allows quick and timely access to an expert opinion at a distance. We analyzed our new experience in cancer Institute of Tehran University of Medical Sciences with the iPath telepathology server of Basel University. One hundred sixty one cases in a period of 32 months were consulted. These cases received for second evaluation but the definite diagnosis could not be made in this centre. The number of images per case ranged from 3 to 32 (mean: 8). Except one case all cases were evaluated by consultants. Definite final diagnosis was achieved in 88/160 (54.7%). Recommendations for further evaluation were offered in 42/160 cases (26%). Major discrepancies were encountered in 30/160 cases (19%). Thirty-nine of the cases (24.3%) were reported within 1 day. The rate of achieving final diagnosis was higher in histological group rather than cytological ones. Increase in number of H&E images had no significant effect on achieving a definite final diagnosis. The rate of achieving final diagnosis in this study is much lower than other similar studies, which could be due to inappropriate sampling images, a potential cause of misdiagnosis in static telepathology. The other possible reason is that all of the cases in this study were problematic cases that a definite diagnosis could not be made for them even in primary consultation. The mean time for achieving a final diagnosis was also more than other studies, which could be for the reasons mentioned above.